9th Annual New Year’s Day 5K at Noon

If you are looking for a 5K to start your New Year off right. Try the 9th Annual New Year’s Day 5K at Noon in Athens, Ga. The best part is that the race will start at NOON not butt crack early.

http://www.active.com/athens-ga/running/distance-running-races/9th-annual-new-years-at-noon-5k-2015

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Daily Inspiration

“A man can fail many times, but he isn't a failure until he begins to blame somebody else.”


~ Steve Prefontaine

How to Treat Black Toenails

 

“BLACK TOENAILS”

A pooling of blood under the toenail, caused by the toe rubbing or hitting the top of your shoe. Often the toe will throb with the pressure of the blood.

Remedies: To relieve the pressure, you need to make a hole in the nail and drain the blood. Either heat the tip of a small, straightened paper clip and use it to burn through the nail until a drop of blood comes out, or sterilize the tip of a 1/16-inch drill bit with heat or alcohol and, by spinning the instrument between your finger and thumb, drill a hole in the nail. Stick your foot in a pan of water until all the blood comes out. (If you’re squeamish about doing this, see a sportsoriented physician.) Apply an antibacterial cream. Relieve inflammation with ice and anti-inflammatories.

If your black toenail isn’t painful, you don’t have to drain the blood. Lubricate with antifungal cream and cover it with a bandage. But monitor the nail, as it will probably loosen and fall offover the next few months. When it gets loose, carefully pull it off and continue to apply the antifungal cream. In the meantime, buy “a pair of running shoes with more room in the toe box.”

 

Excerpt From: Burfoot, Amby. “Runner's World Complete Book of Running.” Rodale, 2009. iBooks.

 

Dinner tonight…


“shrimp, artichoke, and pesto pasta

Recipe by Matthew Kadey, MS, RD

makes 4 servings

total time: 20 minutes

This pasta is a cinch to throw together with long-lasting kitchen staples, such as sun-dried tomatoes, jarred pesto, and frozen shrimp. A half cup of frozen artichoke hearts provides 6 grams of fiber and—unlike the jarred, marinated version—has a fresh, mildly sweet flavor with no added calories. While this dish is perfect for postrun recovery, it also makes an ideal carb-packed meal the night before a long run.

Salt

12 ounces whole grain spirals or shells

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

12 ounces frozen artichoke hearts

1 pound frozen peeled and deveined shrimp, thawed

¾ cup Cilantro-Pumpkin Pesto or store-bought pesto

1 cup (2 ounces) sliced sun-dried tomatoes

Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat. When it boils, salt the water and add the pasta. Cook according to package directions and drain when done.

Meanwhile, heat the oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the artichoke hearts. Cook for 3 to 4 minutes, or until just about heated through.”

“Add the shrimp and cook for 2 minutes, or until the shrimp are just pink and cooked through. Add the cooked pasta, pesto, and sun-dried tomatoes. Toss to coat the pasta and vegetables with the pesto.

NUTRITION PER SERVING: 758 calories, 80 g carbs, 17 g fiber, 46 g protein, 30 g total fat, 6.5 g saturated fat, 960 mg sodium”

Excerpt From: Joanna Sayago Golub & Editors of Runner's World. “The Runner's World Cookbook.” Rodale Press, 2013. iBooks.

This material may be protected by copyright.

 

What?!

WASHINGTON (WNEW) – Going for runs on a regular basis has been linked to a multitude of health benefits in countless research studies, but recent research suggests that too much running is tied to a shorter lifespan.

HealthDay reports the study results revealed on Sunday by Dr. Martin Matsumura, co-director of the Cardiovascular Research Institute at the Lehigh Valley Health Network, found that people who get no exercise along with people considered high-mileage runners both have shorter lifespans than those considered to be running an average amount – although the researchers note that the reasons are still somewhat unclear.

“Our study didn’t find any differences that could explain these longevity differences,” Dr. Martin Matsumura told HealthDay. “What we still don’t understand is defining the optimal dose of running for health and longevity.”

Dr. Matsumura and his colleagues reviewed data from over 3,800 male and female runners who participated in the Masters Running Study, a web-based study of health and training for runners over the age of 35. Nearly 70 percent of the runners self-reported running more than 20 miles each week, and the average of the of the high-mileage runners was 42 years of age.

Information regarding use of painkillers and prescription medicines were compiled with heart risk factors, diabetes, high blood pressure and family history of chronic illness, according to HealthDay.

But the study authors said none of these factors explained the shorter lifespans associated with high-mileage runners versus moderate runners. And use of painkillers was actually more common among average runners.

Dr. James O’Keefe, director of preventive cardiology at the Mid-American Heart Institute in Kansas City, said that although the health risk factors still don’t explain high-mileage runners’ shorter longevity, excessive amounts of running were still potentially related to life-shortening effects.

He told HealthDay there may simply be “too much wear and tear.” He said the “sweet spot” for running is a slow to moderate pace for a total of about 2.5 hours each week – about two to three times each week.

“I certainly don’t tell patients ‘Don’t run,’” Matsumura told HealthDay. But O’Keefe added that “if you want to run a marathon, run one and cross it off your bucket list” as the lifespan-mileage link is subject to continued research.

 

8 Reasons to Sip on Coffee by Liz Applegate Ph.D

Power Performance
Researchers from the U.K. gave cyclists and triathletes a drink with 350 mg of caffeine, coffee with an equal amount of caffeine, decaf coffee, or a placebo drink. One hour later the participants performed a cycling test. The caffeine group and regular coffee group performed equally well—and both were faster than the placebo and decaf groups.

Boost Antioxidants
Arabica coffee beans are rich in antioxidant compounds called caffeoyl quinic acids. One study showed consuming three cups of Arabica coffee daily for four weeks can lower markers for oxidative DNA damage.

Improve Mood
According to a National Institutes of Health study, adults who drink four cups or more of coffee daily are about 10 percent less likely to be depressed than non-coffee drinkers. A recent study from the Harvard School of Public Health suggests that drinking two or more cups daily of caffeinated coffee significantly lowers the risk of suicide. Scientists think caffeine may work as a mild antidepressant by impacting neurotransmitters, such as dopamine.

Lower Heart-Disease Risk
A study review published in the journal Circulation found that moderate coffee intake (three to four cups a day) is associated with a significant reduction in heart-disease risk. And a recent animal study suggests that coffee may positively impact blood vessel function and bloodflow.

Dodge Diabetes
A meta-analysis in the European Journal of Nutrition stated that for every two cups of regular or decaf coffee you consume per day, your risk for type 2 diabetes decreases by 10 to 12 percent. The greatest risk reduction is in drinkers with healthy BMI, which means coffee may help already-slim runners ward off the disease.

Enhance Brain Function
Research shows that the antioxidants in coffee may help protect the brain from cognitive loss and delay the onset of Alzheimer’s disease. For two to four years, researchers tracked participants who were 65 and older and had mild cognitive loss. Subjects who averaged about three cups of coffee daily over that time frame did not progress to Alzheimer’s, while those who consumed less than that amount were more likely to develop the disease.

Protect Your Liver
A review of liver disease research shows that consuming one to two cups of coffee (not just caffeinated beverages) per day can protect this organ, especially for those at risk of poor liver health, such as people who drink more than two alcoholic beverages a day.

Relieve Stress
Take a whiff of coffee and you’ll likely feel better. That’s because coffee contains volatile aroma compounds that affect mood. When mice undergoing maze testing are exposed to these compounds, it reduces their arousal level, exerting an antianxiety effect.

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