Like Mike!

Three decades ago, Nike unleashed Mars Blackmon on the world, and we watched him steal the show from Michael Jordan in promoting the company’s revolutionary basketball sneakers. There’s no such character pitching running shoes these days, though Jordan is getting into the game.

Jordan—a brand of its own under the Nike flag—just launched its first running shoe, the Flight Runner. I know what you’re thinking: What does basketball have to do with running? Well, nothing really. But the Jordan brand has become as synonymous with lifestyle products as it has with high-flying collectible kicks. And that’s most likely the case with the Flight Runner, though Nike has the chops in both spaces to build a shoe that performs as well as it looks.

On the surface, the shoe appears to be equal parts fashion and function. Sure, it has Zoom Air cushioning, similar to what you’d find in the Nike Air Pegasus, but some stylish touches like a “welded shroud” that skirts the shoe just above the midsole are sure to decrease its overall performance as a running shoe. Regardless, you can bet a good many gym-goers and runners will pick up a pair. And why wouldn’t they? It looks good whether you’re on the elliptical machine or at an espresso bar. And its heritage means it’s sure to stand up to a few treadmill miles on occasion.

Another reason to assume you’ll see the Flight Runner sell: Nike knows how to move shoes. According to the latest sales figures from SportsOneSource, a trade publication covering the sporting goods industry, the Nike and Jordan accounted for 173 of the top 250 pairs of athletic shoes sold during the month of February. The Jordan brand claimed 46 of those models. The top running shoes were the men’s and women’s Nike Free 5.0+, holding positions 3 and 5, respectively, of all athletic shoes sales.

By Jeff Dengate

 

 

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How to Buy Running Shoes by Jennifer Van Allen

I thought I would share this article. This article is directed more to the beginners. Enjoy…

1. Don’t skimp.

It may feel like a lot to spend up to A$250 on a pair of running shoes, but the investment is worth it. Consider this: Whatever your new shoes cost, it is likely less than the money and time you’d spend seeing the doctor because you got hurt.

2. See the experts.

It’s best to go to a specialty running shop (not a big-box or department store) where a salesperson can watch you run and help you select a pair of shoes that offer your feet the support they need. Find a specialty running store near you.

3. Size yourself up.

You may think you know your size, but it’s best to get your feet measured each time you buy new shoes. Your feet change over time, and one model’s fit can be drastically different from another’s. You also want to have your feet measured later in the day, when they’re at their biggest. Many people end up getting a running shoe that’s a half size larger than their street shoes. The extra room allows your foot to flex and your toes to move forward with each stride. When you’re standing with both shoes on, make sure you have at least a thumbnail’s space between the tip of the shoe and the end of your longest toe. Try shoes on both feet and take them for a test run around the shop, on a treadmill, or on the sidewalk.

4. Bring what you’ve been wearing.

When you go shopping, take along the shoes, socks, and any inserts that you’ve been using. That way you can make a realistic evaluation of how well the new shoe will fit your feet.

5. Keep up the rotation.

Shoes should be replaced every 300 to 500 miles. Keep track of the date that you bought them in your training log.

6. Don’t be a trendsetter.

There is a dizzying array of shoes to choose from, and it can be tempting to be wooed by a bargain-basement price, shoes that “look fast,” or a promise to cure an injury or help you lose weight. But there is no one best shoe for anyone. There is only one shoe that offers your feet the unique support and fit you need. Try on as many different models and pairs as possible. Don’t shop by price or by fashion. And what about those minimalist shoes designed to mimic barefoot running? There’s no scientific evidence that forgoing shoes decreases injury risk. When you’re just starting out, stick with traditional shoes.

 

Down Warrior…

I took my wife to the Southern Orthopedics yesterday and the diagnosis wasn't good. She was diagnosed with a severe Plantar Fascia Strain and a heel spur in her left foot. She took a cortisone injection directly into her heel, which by the way I would never do, in hopes of avoiding surgey. So she is in a boot and miserable right now. She wants to go running but can't. We head back in a month to see if she has progressed or regressed. Our other option as of now is surgey if the shot and boot plus stretching doesn't work. I'm hoping to avoid surgey for her sake. It sucks big time because I lost my running buddy for awhile.

This is a picture of my wife, Shannon, and her mother after completing the Chilly Dawg 5K in Athens, Georgia last weekend. The temperature during the run was 18 degrees. Tough Cookies!

 

Mizuno Elixir 8

I had Athens Running Company refit me for a pair of running shoes. It’s been a year since I had them do it and I am grateful for doing it. The Mizuno Elixir 8 feel absolutely wonderful on my feet. I am looking forward to breaking in the pair of shoes prior to the Hot Chocalete 5K/15K in Atlanta at the end of January. Nice arch support but yet light weight.

Good stuff…