Best Nike Commercial Ever…

 

 

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How to Treat Black Toenails

 

“BLACK TOENAILS”

A pooling of blood under the toenail, caused by the toe rubbing or hitting the top of your shoe. Often the toe will throb with the pressure of the blood.

Remedies: To relieve the pressure, you need to make a hole in the nail and drain the blood. Either heat the tip of a small, straightened paper clip and use it to burn through the nail until a drop of blood comes out, or sterilize the tip of a 1/16-inch drill bit with heat or alcohol and, by spinning the instrument between your finger and thumb, drill a hole in the nail. Stick your foot in a pan of water until all the blood comes out. (If you’re squeamish about doing this, see a sportsoriented physician.) Apply an antibacterial cream. Relieve inflammation with ice and anti-inflammatories.

If your black toenail isn’t painful, you don’t have to drain the blood. Lubricate with antifungal cream and cover it with a bandage. But monitor the nail, as it will probably loosen and fall offover the next few months. When it gets loose, carefully pull it off and continue to apply the antifungal cream. In the meantime, buy “a pair of running shoes with more room in the toe box.”

 

Excerpt From: Burfoot, Amby. “Runner's World Complete Book of Running.” Rodale, 2009. iBooks.

 

Dinner tonight…


“shrimp, artichoke, and pesto pasta

Recipe by Matthew Kadey, MS, RD

makes 4 servings

total time: 20 minutes

This pasta is a cinch to throw together with long-lasting kitchen staples, such as sun-dried tomatoes, jarred pesto, and frozen shrimp. A half cup of frozen artichoke hearts provides 6 grams of fiber and—unlike the jarred, marinated version—has a fresh, mildly sweet flavor with no added calories. While this dish is perfect for postrun recovery, it also makes an ideal carb-packed meal the night before a long run.

Salt

12 ounces whole grain spirals or shells

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

12 ounces frozen artichoke hearts

1 pound frozen peeled and deveined shrimp, thawed

¾ cup Cilantro-Pumpkin Pesto or store-bought pesto

1 cup (2 ounces) sliced sun-dried tomatoes

Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat. When it boils, salt the water and add the pasta. Cook according to package directions and drain when done.

Meanwhile, heat the oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the artichoke hearts. Cook for 3 to 4 minutes, or until just about heated through.”

“Add the shrimp and cook for 2 minutes, or until the shrimp are just pink and cooked through. Add the cooked pasta, pesto, and sun-dried tomatoes. Toss to coat the pasta and vegetables with the pesto.

NUTRITION PER SERVING: 758 calories, 80 g carbs, 17 g fiber, 46 g protein, 30 g total fat, 6.5 g saturated fat, 960 mg sodium”

Excerpt From: Joanna Sayago Golub & Editors of Runner's World. “The Runner's World Cookbook.” Rodale Press, 2013. iBooks.

This material may be protected by copyright.

 

Do’s and Don’ts for Beginners

Running is a simple activity, but the following guidelines will help you succeed at it.

Don’t begin a running program without a full medical exam.

Don’t attempt to train through an athletic injury. Little aches and pains can sideline you for weeks or months if you don’t take time off and seek medical advice.

Do dress correctly. If it’s dark, wear white or, better yet, reflective clothing. If it’s cold, wear layers of clothing, gloves or mittens, and a wool ski cap to retain heat. Sunblock, sunglasses, a baseball cap, and white clothing make sense on hot days.

Don’t run in worn-out shoes (check them for broken-down heels or very smooth areas where you push off on your strides). Don’t run in shoes that are designed for other sports, such as basketball or tennis sneaks.

Do tell someone where you’ll be running and when you expect to return. Carry some identification and your cell phone.

Do some light stretching exercises prior to your run/walk workouts to reduce muscle tightness and increase range of motion. You should do even more stretching after the workout.

Do watch out for cars, and don’t expect “drivers to watch out for you. Always run facing traffic so that you can see cars approaching. When crossing an intersection, make sure you establish eye contact with the driver before proceeding.

Do include a training partner in your program, if possible. A training partner with similar abilities and goals can add motivation and increase the safety of your running.

Don’t wear headphones when running outside, whether you're “training or racing. They tune you out from your surroundings, making you more vulnerable to all sorts of hazards: cars, bikes, skateboards, dogs, and criminals.

Don’t run in remote areas, especially if you are a woman running alone. If you don’t have a partner, run with a dog or carry a self-defense spray (first ensuring it’s legal to use where you run). Don’t approach a car to give directions, and don’t assume all runners are harmless.”

Excerpt From: Burfoot, Amby. “Runner's World Complete Book of Running.” Rodale, 2009. iBooks.

 

 

Like Mike!

Three decades ago, Nike unleashed Mars Blackmon on the world, and we watched him steal the show from Michael Jordan in promoting the company’s revolutionary basketball sneakers. There’s no such character pitching running shoes these days, though Jordan is getting into the game.

Jordan—a brand of its own under the Nike flag—just launched its first running shoe, the Flight Runner. I know what you’re thinking: What does basketball have to do with running? Well, nothing really. But the Jordan brand has become as synonymous with lifestyle products as it has with high-flying collectible kicks. And that’s most likely the case with the Flight Runner, though Nike has the chops in both spaces to build a shoe that performs as well as it looks.

On the surface, the shoe appears to be equal parts fashion and function. Sure, it has Zoom Air cushioning, similar to what you’d find in the Nike Air Pegasus, but some stylish touches like a “welded shroud” that skirts the shoe just above the midsole are sure to decrease its overall performance as a running shoe. Regardless, you can bet a good many gym-goers and runners will pick up a pair. And why wouldn’t they? It looks good whether you’re on the elliptical machine or at an espresso bar. And its heritage means it’s sure to stand up to a few treadmill miles on occasion.

Another reason to assume you’ll see the Flight Runner sell: Nike knows how to move shoes. According to the latest sales figures from SportsOneSource, a trade publication covering the sporting goods industry, the Nike and Jordan accounted for 173 of the top 250 pairs of athletic shoes sold during the month of February. The Jordan brand claimed 46 of those models. The top running shoes were the men’s and women’s Nike Free 5.0+, holding positions 3 and 5, respectively, of all athletic shoes sales.

By Jeff Dengate

 

 

How to Buy Running Shoes by Jennifer Van Allen

I thought I would share this article. This article is directed more to the beginners. Enjoy…

1. Don’t skimp.

It may feel like a lot to spend up to A$250 on a pair of running shoes, but the investment is worth it. Consider this: Whatever your new shoes cost, it is likely less than the money and time you’d spend seeing the doctor because you got hurt.

2. See the experts.

It’s best to go to a specialty running shop (not a big-box or department store) where a salesperson can watch you run and help you select a pair of shoes that offer your feet the support they need. Find a specialty running store near you.

3. Size yourself up.

You may think you know your size, but it’s best to get your feet measured each time you buy new shoes. Your feet change over time, and one model’s fit can be drastically different from another’s. You also want to have your feet measured later in the day, when they’re at their biggest. Many people end up getting a running shoe that’s a half size larger than their street shoes. The extra room allows your foot to flex and your toes to move forward with each stride. When you’re standing with both shoes on, make sure you have at least a thumbnail’s space between the tip of the shoe and the end of your longest toe. Try shoes on both feet and take them for a test run around the shop, on a treadmill, or on the sidewalk.

4. Bring what you’ve been wearing.

When you go shopping, take along the shoes, socks, and any inserts that you’ve been using. That way you can make a realistic evaluation of how well the new shoe will fit your feet.

5. Keep up the rotation.

Shoes should be replaced every 300 to 500 miles. Keep track of the date that you bought them in your training log.

6. Don’t be a trendsetter.

There is a dizzying array of shoes to choose from, and it can be tempting to be wooed by a bargain-basement price, shoes that “look fast,” or a promise to cure an injury or help you lose weight. But there is no one best shoe for anyone. There is only one shoe that offers your feet the unique support and fit you need. Try on as many different models and pairs as possible. Don’t shop by price or by fashion. And what about those minimalist shoes designed to mimic barefoot running? There’s no scientific evidence that forgoing shoes decreases injury risk. When you’re just starting out, stick with traditional shoes.

 

The 7 Deadly Sins: Runners Edition by Matt Remy

LUST
MANIFESTATION: Drooling over the new Kayanos when the ones you have now are perfectly fine
GLUTTONY
MANIFESTATION: Grabbing more banana halves and bagels from the postrace food table than you could ever hope to eat
GREED
MANIFESTATION: Selling your Boston finisher’s medal on eBay; trying to unload your NYC Marathon entry to some desperate soul for double what you paid for it
SLOTH
MANIFESTATION: I think we all know what this one looks like.
WRATH
MANIFESTATION: Losing your cool when the guy at the running store says the new Kayanos are sold out in your size, and they aren’t expecting another shipment for 6 weeks
ENVY
MANIFESTATION: Coveting thy neighbor’s wife’s half-marathon PR
PRIDE
MANIFESTATION: Checking your appearance in every storefront window that you run past

Excerpt From: Mark Remy & Editors of Runner’s World. “The Runner’s Rule Book.”

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