Best Nike Commercial Ever…

 

 

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Dinner tonight…


“shrimp, artichoke, and pesto pasta

Recipe by Matthew Kadey, MS, RD

makes 4 servings

total time: 20 minutes

This pasta is a cinch to throw together with long-lasting kitchen staples, such as sun-dried tomatoes, jarred pesto, and frozen shrimp. A half cup of frozen artichoke hearts provides 6 grams of fiber and—unlike the jarred, marinated version—has a fresh, mildly sweet flavor with no added calories. While this dish is perfect for postrun recovery, it also makes an ideal carb-packed meal the night before a long run.

Salt

12 ounces whole grain spirals or shells

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

12 ounces frozen artichoke hearts

1 pound frozen peeled and deveined shrimp, thawed

¾ cup Cilantro-Pumpkin Pesto or store-bought pesto

1 cup (2 ounces) sliced sun-dried tomatoes

Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat. When it boils, salt the water and add the pasta. Cook according to package directions and drain when done.

Meanwhile, heat the oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the artichoke hearts. Cook for 3 to 4 minutes, or until just about heated through.”

“Add the shrimp and cook for 2 minutes, or until the shrimp are just pink and cooked through. Add the cooked pasta, pesto, and sun-dried tomatoes. Toss to coat the pasta and vegetables with the pesto.

NUTRITION PER SERVING: 758 calories, 80 g carbs, 17 g fiber, 46 g protein, 30 g total fat, 6.5 g saturated fat, 960 mg sodium”

Excerpt From: Joanna Sayago Golub & Editors of Runner's World. “The Runner's World Cookbook.” Rodale Press, 2013. iBooks.

This material may be protected by copyright.

 

7 bad habits of good runners by Jen Matz

 

  1. Starting out too fast. Going all out in the beginning may work for some runners – especially during shorter distance events — but most of us do better running negative or even splits. Negative splitting means you start off a race slower than goal pace and make up for lost time as you go on – this approach helps you finish a race feeling strong. To keep yourself from getting caught up in race day hype and sprinting out of the gate, wear a GPS watch so you can rein in the pace if it gets out of hand. Or try repeating a mantra to help you keep it slow.
  2. Skimping on sleep. The average adult needs around seven hours of sleep per night. During the peak of training, you may need even more shut-eye. Not getting enough sleep can weaken your immune system and impair your recovery time and performance. Aim to be in bed at least seven hours before you alarm is set to go off.
  3. Consulting Dr. Google. If you have knee pain, one of the first things you’ll probably do is Google something along the lines of “runner knee pain”. Don’t count on WebMD or a running blogger to accurately diagnose what’s ailing you. If you have more than just general aches and pains, and rest and ice isn’t helping, see your doctor. Only a checkup by a real, in-person doctor can get to the bottom of your injury.
  4. Not taking enough time off. If you get sick or hurt in the middle of training, it can be unsettling to take some unplanned rest days. But it’s always better to rest than push it when you’re not feeling 100 percent. Regular rest days are critical to recovery, and unscheduled rest days don’t always hurt either.
  5. Refueling improperly. Your next run’s success depends on what you did immediately following your last run. Refueling with the right foods within the right window of time can help your body replenish glycogen stores and repair muscles, so you’ll feel even stronger during your next workout. Refuel within 30 minutes to one hour of finishing up. Choose a snack that’s high in carbohydrates and contains a small amount of protein, like low-fat chocolate milk or whole wheat toast topped with peanut butter and sliced banana.
  6. Skipping the sunscreen. Outdoor athletes, like runners, have an increased risk of skin cancer. Unless you’re running on a treadmill, you need to cover yourself with sunscreen before every run. Note that 80 percent of the sun’s ultraviolet rays can penetrate through clouds and fog, so lather up everyday to be safe.
  7. Not switching things up. Do you always train the same way and run approximately the same race times? If you have big PR dreams, you’ll need to tweak your training in order to achieve them. Try following a different type of training plan, preferably one with regular speed workouts.

Like Mike!

Three decades ago, Nike unleashed Mars Blackmon on the world, and we watched him steal the show from Michael Jordan in promoting the company’s revolutionary basketball sneakers. There’s no such character pitching running shoes these days, though Jordan is getting into the game.

Jordan—a brand of its own under the Nike flag—just launched its first running shoe, the Flight Runner. I know what you’re thinking: What does basketball have to do with running? Well, nothing really. But the Jordan brand has become as synonymous with lifestyle products as it has with high-flying collectible kicks. And that’s most likely the case with the Flight Runner, though Nike has the chops in both spaces to build a shoe that performs as well as it looks.

On the surface, the shoe appears to be equal parts fashion and function. Sure, it has Zoom Air cushioning, similar to what you’d find in the Nike Air Pegasus, but some stylish touches like a “welded shroud” that skirts the shoe just above the midsole are sure to decrease its overall performance as a running shoe. Regardless, you can bet a good many gym-goers and runners will pick up a pair. And why wouldn’t they? It looks good whether you’re on the elliptical machine or at an espresso bar. And its heritage means it’s sure to stand up to a few treadmill miles on occasion.

Another reason to assume you’ll see the Flight Runner sell: Nike knows how to move shoes. According to the latest sales figures from SportsOneSource, a trade publication covering the sporting goods industry, the Nike and Jordan accounted for 173 of the top 250 pairs of athletic shoes sold during the month of February. The Jordan brand claimed 46 of those models. The top running shoes were the men’s and women’s Nike Free 5.0+, holding positions 3 and 5, respectively, of all athletic shoes sales.

By Jeff Dengate

 

 

What?!

WASHINGTON (WNEW) – Going for runs on a regular basis has been linked to a multitude of health benefits in countless research studies, but recent research suggests that too much running is tied to a shorter lifespan.

HealthDay reports the study results revealed on Sunday by Dr. Martin Matsumura, co-director of the Cardiovascular Research Institute at the Lehigh Valley Health Network, found that people who get no exercise along with people considered high-mileage runners both have shorter lifespans than those considered to be running an average amount – although the researchers note that the reasons are still somewhat unclear.

“Our study didn’t find any differences that could explain these longevity differences,” Dr. Martin Matsumura told HealthDay. “What we still don’t understand is defining the optimal dose of running for health and longevity.”

Dr. Matsumura and his colleagues reviewed data from over 3,800 male and female runners who participated in the Masters Running Study, a web-based study of health and training for runners over the age of 35. Nearly 70 percent of the runners self-reported running more than 20 miles each week, and the average of the of the high-mileage runners was 42 years of age.

Information regarding use of painkillers and prescription medicines were compiled with heart risk factors, diabetes, high blood pressure and family history of chronic illness, according to HealthDay.

But the study authors said none of these factors explained the shorter lifespans associated with high-mileage runners versus moderate runners. And use of painkillers was actually more common among average runners.

Dr. James O’Keefe, director of preventive cardiology at the Mid-American Heart Institute in Kansas City, said that although the health risk factors still don’t explain high-mileage runners’ shorter longevity, excessive amounts of running were still potentially related to life-shortening effects.

He told HealthDay there may simply be “too much wear and tear.” He said the “sweet spot” for running is a slow to moderate pace for a total of about 2.5 hours each week – about two to three times each week.

“I certainly don’t tell patients ‘Don’t run,’” Matsumura told HealthDay. But O’Keefe added that “if you want to run a marathon, run one and cross it off your bucket list” as the lifespan-mileage link is subject to continued research.

 

How to Buy Running Shoes by Jennifer Van Allen

I thought I would share this article. This article is directed more to the beginners. Enjoy…

1. Don’t skimp.

It may feel like a lot to spend up to A$250 on a pair of running shoes, but the investment is worth it. Consider this: Whatever your new shoes cost, it is likely less than the money and time you’d spend seeing the doctor because you got hurt.

2. See the experts.

It’s best to go to a specialty running shop (not a big-box or department store) where a salesperson can watch you run and help you select a pair of shoes that offer your feet the support they need. Find a specialty running store near you.

3. Size yourself up.

You may think you know your size, but it’s best to get your feet measured each time you buy new shoes. Your feet change over time, and one model’s fit can be drastically different from another’s. You also want to have your feet measured later in the day, when they’re at their biggest. Many people end up getting a running shoe that’s a half size larger than their street shoes. The extra room allows your foot to flex and your toes to move forward with each stride. When you’re standing with both shoes on, make sure you have at least a thumbnail’s space between the tip of the shoe and the end of your longest toe. Try shoes on both feet and take them for a test run around the shop, on a treadmill, or on the sidewalk.

4. Bring what you’ve been wearing.

When you go shopping, take along the shoes, socks, and any inserts that you’ve been using. That way you can make a realistic evaluation of how well the new shoe will fit your feet.

5. Keep up the rotation.

Shoes should be replaced every 300 to 500 miles. Keep track of the date that you bought them in your training log.

6. Don’t be a trendsetter.

There is a dizzying array of shoes to choose from, and it can be tempting to be wooed by a bargain-basement price, shoes that “look fast,” or a promise to cure an injury or help you lose weight. But there is no one best shoe for anyone. There is only one shoe that offers your feet the unique support and fit you need. Try on as many different models and pairs as possible. Don’t shop by price or by fashion. And what about those minimalist shoes designed to mimic barefoot running? There’s no scientific evidence that forgoing shoes decreases injury risk. When you’re just starting out, stick with traditional shoes.