Daily Inspiration

“A man can fail many times, but he isn't a failure until he begins to blame somebody else.”


~ Steve Prefontaine

Advertisements

How to Treat Black Toenails

 

“BLACK TOENAILS”

A pooling of blood under the toenail, caused by the toe rubbing or hitting the top of your shoe. Often the toe will throb with the pressure of the blood.

Remedies: To relieve the pressure, you need to make a hole in the nail and drain the blood. Either heat the tip of a small, straightened paper clip and use it to burn through the nail until a drop of blood comes out, or sterilize the tip of a 1/16-inch drill bit with heat or alcohol and, by spinning the instrument between your finger and thumb, drill a hole in the nail. Stick your foot in a pan of water until all the blood comes out. (If you’re squeamish about doing this, see a sportsoriented physician.) Apply an antibacterial cream. Relieve inflammation with ice and anti-inflammatories.

If your black toenail isn’t painful, you don’t have to drain the blood. Lubricate with antifungal cream and cover it with a bandage. But monitor the nail, as it will probably loosen and fall offover the next few months. When it gets loose, carefully pull it off and continue to apply the antifungal cream. In the meantime, buy “a pair of running shoes with more room in the toe box.”

 

Excerpt From: Burfoot, Amby. “Runner's World Complete Book of Running.” Rodale, 2009. iBooks.

 

How to Buy Running Shoes by Jennifer Van Allen

I thought I would share this article. This article is directed more to the beginners. Enjoy…

1. Don’t skimp.

It may feel like a lot to spend up to A$250 on a pair of running shoes, but the investment is worth it. Consider this: Whatever your new shoes cost, it is likely less than the money and time you’d spend seeing the doctor because you got hurt.

2. See the experts.

It’s best to go to a specialty running shop (not a big-box or department store) where a salesperson can watch you run and help you select a pair of shoes that offer your feet the support they need. Find a specialty running store near you.

3. Size yourself up.

You may think you know your size, but it’s best to get your feet measured each time you buy new shoes. Your feet change over time, and one model’s fit can be drastically different from another’s. You also want to have your feet measured later in the day, when they’re at their biggest. Many people end up getting a running shoe that’s a half size larger than their street shoes. The extra room allows your foot to flex and your toes to move forward with each stride. When you’re standing with both shoes on, make sure you have at least a thumbnail’s space between the tip of the shoe and the end of your longest toe. Try shoes on both feet and take them for a test run around the shop, on a treadmill, or on the sidewalk.

4. Bring what you’ve been wearing.

When you go shopping, take along the shoes, socks, and any inserts that you’ve been using. That way you can make a realistic evaluation of how well the new shoe will fit your feet.

5. Keep up the rotation.

Shoes should be replaced every 300 to 500 miles. Keep track of the date that you bought them in your training log.

6. Don’t be a trendsetter.

There is a dizzying array of shoes to choose from, and it can be tempting to be wooed by a bargain-basement price, shoes that “look fast,” or a promise to cure an injury or help you lose weight. But there is no one best shoe for anyone. There is only one shoe that offers your feet the unique support and fit you need. Try on as many different models and pairs as possible. Don’t shop by price or by fashion. And what about those minimalist shoes designed to mimic barefoot running? There’s no scientific evidence that forgoing shoes decreases injury risk. When you’re just starting out, stick with traditional shoes.

 

Taste of Athens 10K

My official time for today's 10K was 50:52. A 6 minute improvement from the previous year. The weather was not too bad. It was 37 degrees with wind gust up to 22 MPH during the race. The wind did make the hills, which were many, tough to climb but nothing beats a nice stroll through Athens, Ga. Now on to the Spring Has Sprung 15K next week at Inman Park in Atlanta.