Do’s and Don’ts for Beginners

Running is a simple activity, but the following guidelines will help you succeed at it.

Don’t begin a running program without a full medical exam.

Don’t attempt to train through an athletic injury. Little aches and pains can sideline you for weeks or months if you don’t take time off and seek medical advice.

Do dress correctly. If it’s dark, wear white or, better yet, reflective clothing. If it’s cold, wear layers of clothing, gloves or mittens, and a wool ski cap to retain heat. Sunblock, sunglasses, a baseball cap, and white clothing make sense on hot days.

Don’t run in worn-out shoes (check them for broken-down heels or very smooth areas where you push off on your strides). Don’t run in shoes that are designed for other sports, such as basketball or tennis sneaks.

Do tell someone where you’ll be running and when you expect to return. Carry some identification and your cell phone.

Do some light stretching exercises prior to your run/walk workouts to reduce muscle tightness and increase range of motion. You should do even more stretching after the workout.

Do watch out for cars, and don’t expect “drivers to watch out for you. Always run facing traffic so that you can see cars approaching. When crossing an intersection, make sure you establish eye contact with the driver before proceeding.

Do include a training partner in your program, if possible. A training partner with similar abilities and goals can add motivation and increase the safety of your running.

Don’t wear headphones when running outside, whether you're “training or racing. They tune you out from your surroundings, making you more vulnerable to all sorts of hazards: cars, bikes, skateboards, dogs, and criminals.

Don’t run in remote areas, especially if you are a woman running alone. If you don’t have a partner, run with a dog or carry a self-defense spray (first ensuring it’s legal to use where you run). Don’t approach a car to give directions, and don’t assume all runners are harmless.”

Excerpt From: Burfoot, Amby. “Runner's World Complete Book of Running.” Rodale, 2009. iBooks.

 

 

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Like Mike!

Three decades ago, Nike unleashed Mars Blackmon on the world, and we watched him steal the show from Michael Jordan in promoting the company’s revolutionary basketball sneakers. There’s no such character pitching running shoes these days, though Jordan is getting into the game.

Jordan—a brand of its own under the Nike flag—just launched its first running shoe, the Flight Runner. I know what you’re thinking: What does basketball have to do with running? Well, nothing really. But the Jordan brand has become as synonymous with lifestyle products as it has with high-flying collectible kicks. And that’s most likely the case with the Flight Runner, though Nike has the chops in both spaces to build a shoe that performs as well as it looks.

On the surface, the shoe appears to be equal parts fashion and function. Sure, it has Zoom Air cushioning, similar to what you’d find in the Nike Air Pegasus, but some stylish touches like a “welded shroud” that skirts the shoe just above the midsole are sure to decrease its overall performance as a running shoe. Regardless, you can bet a good many gym-goers and runners will pick up a pair. And why wouldn’t they? It looks good whether you’re on the elliptical machine or at an espresso bar. And its heritage means it’s sure to stand up to a few treadmill miles on occasion.

Another reason to assume you’ll see the Flight Runner sell: Nike knows how to move shoes. According to the latest sales figures from SportsOneSource, a trade publication covering the sporting goods industry, the Nike and Jordan accounted for 173 of the top 250 pairs of athletic shoes sold during the month of February. The Jordan brand claimed 46 of those models. The top running shoes were the men’s and women’s Nike Free 5.0+, holding positions 3 and 5, respectively, of all athletic shoes sales.

By Jeff Dengate

 

 

What?!

WASHINGTON (WNEW) – Going for runs on a regular basis has been linked to a multitude of health benefits in countless research studies, but recent research suggests that too much running is tied to a shorter lifespan.

HealthDay reports the study results revealed on Sunday by Dr. Martin Matsumura, co-director of the Cardiovascular Research Institute at the Lehigh Valley Health Network, found that people who get no exercise along with people considered high-mileage runners both have shorter lifespans than those considered to be running an average amount – although the researchers note that the reasons are still somewhat unclear.

“Our study didn’t find any differences that could explain these longevity differences,” Dr. Martin Matsumura told HealthDay. “What we still don’t understand is defining the optimal dose of running for health and longevity.”

Dr. Matsumura and his colleagues reviewed data from over 3,800 male and female runners who participated in the Masters Running Study, a web-based study of health and training for runners over the age of 35. Nearly 70 percent of the runners self-reported running more than 20 miles each week, and the average of the of the high-mileage runners was 42 years of age.

Information regarding use of painkillers and prescription medicines were compiled with heart risk factors, diabetes, high blood pressure and family history of chronic illness, according to HealthDay.

But the study authors said none of these factors explained the shorter lifespans associated with high-mileage runners versus moderate runners. And use of painkillers was actually more common among average runners.

Dr. James O’Keefe, director of preventive cardiology at the Mid-American Heart Institute in Kansas City, said that although the health risk factors still don’t explain high-mileage runners’ shorter longevity, excessive amounts of running were still potentially related to life-shortening effects.

He told HealthDay there may simply be “too much wear and tear.” He said the “sweet spot” for running is a slow to moderate pace for a total of about 2.5 hours each week – about two to three times each week.

“I certainly don’t tell patients ‘Don’t run,’” Matsumura told HealthDay. But O’Keefe added that “if you want to run a marathon, run one and cross it off your bucket list” as the lifespan-mileage link is subject to continued research.

 

SweetWater 420 5K

This year, I made a promise to myself to enter more long distance races. I decided that I feel that I get more out of 10K's and up rather than the 5K races. With that said, I will be partaking in the Sweetwater 420 5K on April 19th. I couldn't pass up on an event like this one. For $38, you can get registered and purchase the three day event as well. That give you an opportunity to see the likes of Sublime, Chris Robinson and Steel Pulse. Plus you get a beer voucher for after the run.

A quick morning run with a post race beer and Sublime can't beat it!

 

Taste of Athens 10K

My official time for today's 10K was 50:52. A 6 minute improvement from the previous year. The weather was not too bad. It was 37 degrees with wind gust up to 22 MPH during the race. The wind did make the hills, which were many, tough to climb but nothing beats a nice stroll through Athens, Ga. Now on to the Spring Has Sprung 15K next week at Inman Park in Atlanta.